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In response to those alarmist statements on the Sound Choice COVID-19 vaccine chart webpage:

White text ... Quotes from https://soundchoice.org/vaccines/covid-19-vaccine-chart/
Underlined text ... My emphasis added


With these vaccines being rushed to market, there are serious safety concerns.

Were the COVID-19 vaccines rushed?


In the trials, there have been reports of serious injury in several of the vaccine candidates.

Can you trust the vaccine data?
Serious side effects are extremely rare.


Furthermore, the researchers are following trial subjects only for a short time and there is no way to determine long-term side effects, such as autoimmune disorders, that generally take a year or more to manifest after vaccination.

COVID-19 can cause autoimmune disease.
COVID-19 vaccines reduce COVID-19 infection.

Past side effects usually manifested within nine weeks following vaccination.

Antibody-dependent enhancement has not been observed in hundreds of millions of vaccinated people.

U.S. puts new warning on J&J coronavirus vaccine for autoimmune disorder

(Guillain-Barre´ syndrome)

Weissman said such concerns weren't applicable with the COVID-19 vaccines because they use a new kind RNA [sic], which would not cause autoimmune disease.

Modified mRNA vaccines have since been given to people for five years now.

"There is no data that says an mRNA vaccine can cause an autoimmune disease," he said in an email. "I have not seen or heard of a single report that mRNA vaccines cause autoimmunity."

...from https://apnews.com/article/fact-checking-afs:Content:9889529642#

In one area of concern, the UCI researchers found that immune-compromised people -- such as those who've had organ transplants and are on immune-suppressing drugs -- don't develop high antibody levels after vaccination. "We need to discover ways to boost immunity in the immune compromised," Felgner said.

...from https://www.mercurynews.com/2021/04/29/which-is-better-for-developing-immunity-covid-19-vaccine-or-natural-infection/#


Researchers around the world are voicing their concerns about the potential immediate and long-term side-effects of these rushed vaccines, including the possibility of infertility in females.

"There's never been any vaccine that's been linked with infertility," he said.

...from https://khn.org/morning-breakout/pregnancy-study-on-vaccines-effects-debunks-social-media-rumors/

Pregnant people are more likely to get severely ill with COVID-19 compared with non-pregnant people.

...There is currently no evidence that any vaccines, including COVID-19 vaccines, cause fertility problems--problems trying to get pregnant.

...from https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/recommendations/pregnancy.html#

Offit says to consider that 70 million Americans have been infected, or about 20% of the population. If the infertility theory was true, he says, you'd expect that the body making antibodies against the natural infection would show up in our fertility statistics. It hasn't.

"There's no evidence that this pandemic has changed fertility patterns," Offit says.

He says there are cases where vaccines have caused biological effects linked to a disease. Take measles, for example. After a measles vaccine, you can get little broken blood vessels, called petechiae, as a result of a problem with blood clotting. It's rare, but it can happen. The vaccine causes that phenomenon, he says, because measles, the disease, can also cause it.

"If natural infection doesn't alter fertility, why would a vaccine do it?" says Offit, who has been reviewing clinical trials behind the vaccines as an adviser to the FDA.

...from https://www.webmd.com/vaccines/covid-19-vaccine/news/20210112/why-covid-vaccines-are-falsely-linked-to-infertility#

Confusion arose when a false report surfaced on social media, saying that the spike protein on this coronavirus was the same as another spike protein called syncitin-1 that is involved in the growth and attachment of the placenta during pregnancy. The false report said that getting the COVID-19 vaccine would cause a woman's body to fight this different spike protein and affect her fertility. The two spike proteins are completely different and distinct, and getting the COVID-19 vaccine will not affect the fertility of women who are seeking to become pregnant, including through in vitro fertilization methods.

...from https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-19-vaccines-myth-versus-fact#


Children's Health Defense and the Informed Consent Action Network have been following the science closely and are good resources for everything COVID. They can be followed at https://childrenshealthdefense.org/ and https://www.icandecide.org/covid/.

Children's Health Defense is rated as "CONSPIRACY-PSEUDOSCIENCE" at mediabiasfactcheck.org.

Here's my COVID-19 page.


For an explanation of the various types of vaccines in development, please see https://lozierinstitute.org/a-visual-aid-to-viral-infection-and-vaccine-production/.

That page may be ok... I just skimmed it.
Mediabiasfactcheck.org rates Lozier as "RIGHT BIAS".

Here's most of my vaccine info.
How mRNA vaccines work (Pfizer, Moderna)
How adenovirus vaccines work (J&J)


You can learn more about the mRNA vaccines and the PREP Act, which will shield COVID-19 vaccine makers from all liability here https://informedchoicewa.org/news/fast-facts-on-covid-19-vaccine-concerns/.

Why are vaccine makers immune from liability?


Pathogenic priming likely contributes to serious and critical illness and mortality in COVID-19 via autoimmunity (nih.gov) Dr. James Lyons-Weiler April 2020

I think this means vaccines cause autoimmune conditions, which they don't.

I often have trouble reading scientific studies and the CDC's technical language, so I rely on the media's analysis of scientific data.
Or better yet, meta-analysis of multiple studies.
I also am biased toward dumbed-down stuff.

I think the scientific consensus fits the facts better than the Sound Choice statements.
Scientific consensus carries more weight than minority opinion.

How do you know who to believe?




mark@chiptape.com